Moving on Up! Therapeutic movement for postnatal anxiety and depression: Finding significance through alongsideness, enquiring collaboratively and living theory action research in health visiting

TitleMoving on Up! Therapeutic movement for postnatal anxiety and depression: Finding significance through alongsideness, enquiring collaboratively and living theory action research in health visiting
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsPound, R
Refereed DesignationRefereed
JournalEducational Journal of Living Theories
Volume7
Start Page74
Issue2
Pagination74-­101
Date Published12/2014
Type of Articleliving theory
ISSN2009-1788
Abstract
Moving on Up! is a multi-agency project to develop therapeutic movement for mothers with postnatal depression and promote physical activity in families. It is a collaboration between the Active Lifestyle Team of an English local authority, movement therapists, health visitors, crèche staff to care for the babies separately, and mothers, providing opportunity for the author to explore her health visiting values of ‘alongsideness’. Whilst ‘alongsideness’ describes a philosophy of health visiting, it also describes a relational methodology for creating practice knowledge that sees everyone as valuable knowledge creators in their own lives (Pound, 2003). Participants consider their uniqueness within a collective sense of community and begin to recognise their own significance as a state of mental wellbeing. Values of alongsideness act as explanatory principles and standards for practice evaluation. As an epistemology, alongsideness employs Living Theory (Whitehead 1989). Accessibility for participants unfamiliar with this research is increased by calling the developmental process ‘enquiring collaboratively’. The author explains the energised commitment created by the process and its influence on her view of alongside practice and researching, on the project team, mothers, the project itself and agencies involved.
Short TitleMoving on Up! Therapeutic movement for postnatal anxiety and depression
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